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Not Sure You Have COVID-19? Here Are the Symptoms for Coronavirus, Flu, and Allergies

Experts note that the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), the flu, and allergies have different symptoms. The main symptoms of the novel coronavirus are fever, tiredness, dry cough, and shortness of breath.

The CDC recommends that all people should wear cloth face masks in public places where it’s difficult to maintain a 6-foot distance from others. This will help slow the spread of the virus from people without symptoms or people who do not know they have contracted the virus. Cloth face masks should be worn while continuing to practice social distancing. Instructions for wearing masks can be found here

If you have a runny nose or itchy eyes, it doesn’t mean you have the novel coronavirus. However, if you have a dry cough, fatigue, and a fever, you might have COVID-19. Then again, it could also be seasonal flu.

There are many symptoms of cold, flu, and COVID that are similar, and it may be difficult to distinguish. They’re all caused by viruses, but different viruses cause each of these infections.

However, one key difference between the three is a symptom of coronavirus is shortness of breath. Shortness of breath is a common sign of COVID-19 which occurs prior to the development of pneumonia. With COVID-19, shortness of breath often occurs 5 to 10 days after the first sign of fever.

Generally, the flu or a cold does not cause shortness of breath unless it has progressed to pneumonia, in which case you’ll also want to contact your healthcare provider.

Sneezing isn’t a symptom

Sneezing, runny nose, facial pain, postnasal drip, and itchy eyes are common symptoms of allergies or the common cold. But they’re not typical of COVID-19.

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough,” according to the World Health Organization (WHO). “Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat, or diarrhea.”

COVID-19 symptoms usually appear 2 to 14 days after exposure. However, “Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don’t feel unwell,” according to the WHO. These people can still transmit the virus to those around them, even if they don’t feel ill.

Allergies have chronic symptoms

COVID-19, like the flu or common cold, is an acute illness, meaning people feel fine until symptoms start showing up.

Allergies, on the other hand, are usually chronic, presenting with symptoms off and on for weeks, months, or even years. Experts also noted that, in most parts of the country, it’s not allergy season yet.

Allergies also may cause wheezing, especially in people with asthma. Allergy symptoms tend to vary with the environment: worsening with exposure to dust, pollen, or animal dander, whereas cold symptoms tend to persist regardless of time of day, weather, locality, or other environmental factors.

Also, as with COVID-19, colds are more likely to have generalized symptoms like fever, headache, and body aches, whereas allergies usually affect only the respiratory tract. Allergy symptoms tend to improve with antihistamine and other allergy-specific medication. Colds are more likely to respond to decongestants, acetaminophen, fluids, and rest.

covid-19 symptoms flu common cold allergies

Despite symptoms, it’s not the flu

COVID-19 is not the flu. As one of a class of pathogens known as coronaviruses, it’s actually more closely related to the common cold than the seasonal flu.

However, despite some overlap, the typical symptoms of COVID-19 are more similar to the flu (fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue) than the common cold (runny or stuffy nose, sore throat, cough, congestion, slight body aches, mild headache, sneezing, low-grade fever, malaise).

If you have a mild case of COVID-19, the flu, or a cold, treatment is geared toward management of symptoms.

Cases can be life threatening

Mild cases of COVID-19 are thought to last approximately 2 weeks. Almost nobody dies of the common cold. And most seasonal allergies are more annoying than dangerous.

COVID-19 has the potential to cause even more fatalities because it’s easily transmitted, the population lacks any immunity to the disease, and complications in serious cases may include life threatening pneumonia.

If you’re feeling sick or you think you have been exposed to COVID-19, you should self-quarantine for at least 2 weeks to prevent further spread of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Severe symptoms of COVID-19 that require immediate medical attention include difficulty breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips or face, the latter indicating a shortage of oxygen in the bloodstream, according to the CDC.

Around one out of every six people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing,” the WHO said. “Older people and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems, or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness.”

Do you have symptoms of COVID-19? Your options for care

Call your primary care provider and discuss symptoms before visiting a healthcare facility, or book online video doctors visit/telehealth consultations through mobile app Medihome or call healthline 19009204 in Vietnam.

Medihome is one of the best-known telehealth providers that allows patients to receive medical advice and instructions at home by providing them with a platform to connect with real doctors.

Users can make health-related inquiries, look up medications, and search for the nearest clinics and pharmacies at the comfort of their own home.

For patients who prefer to see their doctor in person, Dr.Binh Tele_Clinic is always open and continue to welcome patients for their appointments. The health care organization is closely monitoring COVID-19 and is following guidance from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and World Health Organization, MOH of Vietnam in the care of patients.

Source: Healthline

13 Foods That Are Good for High Blood Pressure

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, refers to the pressure of blood against your artery walls. Over time, high blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage that leads to heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, and other problems. Hypertension is sometimes called the silent killer because it produces no symptoms and can go unnoticed — and untreated — for years.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Trusted Source (CDC), an estimated 75 million Americans have high blood pressure. Many risk factors for high blood pressure are out of your control, such as age, family history, gender, and race. But there are also factors you can control, such as exercise and diet. A diet that can help control blood pressure is rich in potassium, magnesium, and fiber and lower in sodium.

13 foods that help lower blood pressure

  1. Leafy greens

Potassium helps your kidneys get rid of more sodium through your urine. This in turn lowers your blood pressure.

Leafy greens, which are high in potassium, include: romaine lettuce, arugula, kale, turnip greens, collard greens, spinach, beet greens.

Canned vegetables often have added sodium. But frozen vegetables contain as many nutrients as fresh vegetables, and they’re easier to store. You can also blend these veggies with bananas and nut milk for a healthy, sweet green juice.

  1. Berries

Berries, especially blueberries, are rich in natural compounds called flavonoids. One study found that consuming these compounds might prevent hypertension and help lower blood pressure.

Blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are easy to add to your diet. You can put them on your cereal or granola in the morning, or keep frozen berries on hand for a quick and healthy dessert.

  1. Red beets

Beets are high in nitric oxide, which can help open your blood vessels and lower blood pressure. Researchers also found that the nitrates in beetroot juice lowered research participants’ blood pressure within just 24 hours.

You can juice your own beets or simply cook and eat the whole root. Beetroot is delicious when roasted or added to stir-fries and stews. You can also bake them into chips. Be careful when handling beets — the juice can stain your hands and clothes.

  1. Skim milk and yogurt

Skim milk is an excellent source of calcium and is low in fat. These are both important elements of a diet for lowering blood pressure. You can also opt for yogurt if you don’t like milk.

According to the American Heart Association, women who ate five or more servings of yogurt a week experienced a 20 percent reduction in their risk for developing high blood pressure.

Try incorporating granola, almond slivers, and fruits into your yogurt for extra heart-healthy benefits. When buying yogurt, be sure to check for added sugar. The lower the sugar quantity per serving, the better.

  1. Oatmeal

Oatmeal fits the bill for a high-fiber, low-fat, and low-sodium way to lower your blood pressure. Eating oatmeal for breakfast is a great way to fuel up for the day.

Overnight oats are a popular breakfast option. To make them, soak 1/2 cup of rolled oats and 1/2 cup of nut milk in a jar. In the morning, stir and add berries, granola, and cinnamon to taste.

  1. Bananas

Eating foods that are rich in potassium is better than taking supplements. Slice a banana into your cereal or oatmeal for a potassium-rich addition. You can also take one to go along with a boiled egg for a quick breakfast or snack.

  1. Salmon, mackerel, and fish with omega-3s

Fish are a great source of lean protein. Fatty fish like mackerel and salmon are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and lower triglycerides. In addition to these fish sources, trout contains vitamin D. Foods rarely contain vitamin D, and this hormone-like vitamin has properties that can lower blood pressure.

One benefit of preparing fish is that it’s easy to flavor and cook. To try it, place a fillet of salmon in parchment paper and season with herbs, lemon, and olive oil. Bake the fish in a preheated oven at 450°F for 12-15 minutes.

  1. Seeds

Unsalted seeds are high in potassium, magnesium, and other minerals known to reduce blood pressure. Enjoy ¼ cup of sunflower, pumpkin, or squash seeds as a snack between meals.

  1. Garlic and herbs

CDC advises that arlic can help reduce hypertension by increasing the amount of nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide helps promote vasodilation, or the widening of arteries, to reduce blood pressure.

Incorporating flavorful herbs and spices into your daily diet can also help you cut back on your salt intake. Examples of herbs and spices you can add include basil, cinnamon, thyme, rosemary, and more.

  1. Dark chocolate

A 2015 study found that eating dark chocolate is associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The study suggests that up to 100 grams per day of dark chocolate may be associated with a lower risk of CVD.

Dark chocolate contains more than 60 percent cocoa solids and has less sugar than regular chocolate. You can add dark chocolate to yogurt or eat it with fruits, such as strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries, as a healthy dessert.

   11. Pistachios

Pistachios are a healthy way to decrease blood pressure by reducing peripheral vascular resistance, or blood vessel tightening, and heart rate. CDC found that a diet with one serving of pistachios a day helps reduce blood pressure.

You can incorporate pistachios into your diet by adding them to crusts, pesto sauces, and salads, or by eating them plain as a snack.

  1. Olive oil

Olive oil is an example of a healthy fat. It contains polyphenols, which are inflammation-fighting compounds that can help reduce blood pressure.

Olive oil can help you meet your two to three daily servings of fat as part of the DASH diet (see below for more about this diet). It’s also a great alternative to canola oil, butter, or commercial salad dressing.

  1. Pomegranates

Pomegranates are a healthy fruit that you can enjoy raw or as a juice. One study concluded that drinking a cup of pomegranate juice once a day for four weeks helps lower blood pressure over the short term.

Pomegranate juice is tasty with a healthy breakfast. Be sure to check the sugar content in store-bought juices, as the added sugars can negate the health benefits.

Through a heart-healthy diet, you can reduce your risks for hypertension and promote good health overall.

Source: Healthline.